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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> president obama arranged a new year's deal to elude the fiscal cliff. republicans and democrats both consented to the deal. now neither party is happy with the outcome. democrats complain that obama caved. because the president's plan allows george w. bush's tax cuts to become permanent. for those making less than $400,000 a year. these democrat critics fear that obama's second term instead of being quote, unquote bold will be quote, unquote cautious as his first term. and on the right, republicans moan and grown and say that -- groan and say that obama is demeaning in the way he deals with house speaker john boehner. hold on, says columnist rockman. we expect too much of obama he says because in the united states, we subscribe to the quote, unquote myth of the imperial presidency. other transformational democratic presidents such as fdr and lbj, rockman says, have substantial democratic majorities in both the senate and in the house to enact their landmark legislation. obama in contrast has had to work with a narrow democratic majority in the senate and with an opposition party, the
years ago, shortly after barack obama was elected as our first african-american president. you need to know that martines grew up in a rough section of new york. brooklyn for you out of towners. but when his family moved, he encountered racism head on. he went to law school and became an advocate for tenants rights in boston where he began to scratch poems on legal pads while waiting in court houses for cases to be called. you can't read any of his 16 books of poems and essay, and most recently, the trouble ball, without understanding a man who is a struggling writer, whose past is a living, breathing news whispering over his shoulder as he scribbles the names of ancestors who once pulled the oars over troubled waters. it was in the wake of president barack obama's victory that brought him here, to the former slave frederick douglas skpchlt with it, a poem. >> rochester, new york, november 7, 2008. this is the long titude and latitude of the impossible. this is the epicenter of the unthinkable. this is the crossroads of the unimaginable, the tomb of frederick douglas three days afte
not be supporting a 46-year-old black guy named barack obama to be the next leader of the free world. that is not where the smart money went. people have got involved in our campaign because they believed politics as usual, business as usual is not adequate. it is not that they dislike some of the other candidates. they think that -- let's take the example of health care. if we cannot break the gridlock between democrats and republicans but if we cannot overcome the insurance companies and drug company lobbyists that have a lock on washington will not get anything passed. it is not -- it does not matter if our plan is better. the second thing my supporters understand, the day i am inaugurated, this country looks at itself differently and the world books of america differently. if you believe we have to heal america and we have to prepare our standing -- repair our standing in the world, my supporters believe i am a messenger who can deliver that message around the world in and out -- a way that no other candidate can. if you have a guy named obama, that isssein different from george
of investors in foreign governments? i mean, even three years ago barack obama expressed concern about the long term debt and the confidence of people in the u.s. government. take a listen. >> there may be some tax provisions that can encourage businesses to hire sooner rather than sitting on the sidelines. so we're taking a look at those. i think it is important, though, to recognize that if we keep on adding to the debt, even in the midst of this recovery, that at some point, people could lose confidence in the us economy in a way that could actually lead to a double-dip recession. >> i remember that well. and at the time it was going on, i do occasionally find myself in meetings with very serious people myself. i guess i am personally one now and then. there was this widespread view among people, and not all of it venal, not all of it self-interested, that somehow things were hanging by a thread. that any day now we could have a run on u.s. government debt, which was wrong. but, okay, i can see how people could for a while have believed that. but a lot of time has gone by since then. and i h
that the democrats are doing something, when barack obama first ran for president in 2008, he promised his first year he would push a comprehensive immigration reform bill. he just didn't do it. this time he got 71% of the latina vote and a lot of latinos were saying, wait a minute, you promised, you didn't deliver, you better do it this time. while you're seeing a lot of republicans stepping up to the plate, you're also seeing democrats getting serious. >> there's another issue, too. scott, i think you're seeing the public opinion on this issue has really shifted in the last couple years. a new public opinion tragedy poll this week shows 87% of americans support some kind of path to citizenship. republicans are hearing that message as well. >> that's an interesting point. >> coming back to debra's -- >> as a conservative columnist for "the chronicle" what is at stake for republicans in this debate? >> go ahead, scott. >> i'm sorry. i think, just to debra's point, latinos really are tired, they say they're being used as a wedge. the fact immigration reform didn't happen was sort of helpful to the dem
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)